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Founder and Owner of the Flexbone Association. Since 2007 we have provided the tools necessary for teams to succeed running the Flexbone Association System. Over the last ten years over 200 teams have been instructed by the Flexbone Association. I've consulted with teams and or run camps everywhere from Belfair, WA to Key West, FL. The Flexbone Association strives daily to help coaches succeed with this time tested offense, I have been a football coach for 16 seasons, currently at Harrison High School in Kennesaw, GA I played at St. Mary's Springs High School in Fond du Lac, WI under legendary head coach Bob Hyland. I've been fortunate to be part of five state championship teams (1997,1998,2002,2011,2012). In 2011-2012 St. Mary's Springs led the state of Wisconsin in scoring and set consecutive school records for points scored, Psalm 27

The Media Perpetrates the “Chop Block” Myth Yet Again


(My commentary in quotes)

For the second straight week, Notre Dame’s defense will take to the practice field Tuesday with its focus on shedding chop blocks and reaffirming triple option assignments.

Chop Blocks are Illegal. Navy/Georgia Tech and other Flexbone Triple Option teams don’t chop block deliberately. Backside scoop blocks are called cut blocks, which are legal from coast to coast. An article published earlier in the week details how Flexbone Triple Option teams block on the backside

The Irish welcome Navy to South Bend this weekend on the heels of a 45-10 win over fellow service academy Air Force in Colorado Springs Saturday. The military teams both lean on an option offense to mitigate their size disadvantage and throw opposing defenses a change-up. Playing them in consecutive games should give the Irish the benefit of a shorter adjustment period.

“It definitely takes that first long series just to get used to it just to get in rhythm and feel the tempo out,” said senior cornerback Bennett Jackson after the win at Air Force. “The scout team does a great job in practice, but it’s never really realistic. I think we got it after the first series.”

The Falcons spun Notre Dame’s defense in circles during its first look at the triple option in 14 months. Air Force ran the ball nine times on its way to a touchdown on its opening drive. Six of the nine attempts picked up at least eight yards on the ground, including a 21-yard run from Anthony Lacoste and a 10-yard score from Colton Hunstman on the following play.

……………The drawback to back-to-back games against the triple option is the potential toll it takes on the ankles and knees of the defense’s front seven. Defensive end Sheldon Day and outside linebacker Ishaq Williams both watched the second half of the Air Force game in sweatpants. Day needed attention on the same ankle that kept him out of the majority of October. Williams hurt his knee during the first quarter and did not return.

Kelly said William isn’t likely to play against Navy. Day is questionable, along with nose guard Louis Nix, who skipped the trip to Colorado because he was nursing sore knees. Kelly said before that game that stopping chop blocks is not Nix’s “cup of tea.

This coming from the same coach who famously said at halftime of the 2010 Navy-Notre Dame game that “They came out and ran the triple option in the first half. We weren’t prepared for that.”

“They don’t like it,” he said of his defensive linemen Sunday. “Clearly they’d rather have teams that don’t go below the waist. I think they’ve become so much more aware of how to defend and take on those blocks that it’s less of a concern. I wouldn’t say it’s the kind of teams they enjoy playing against, but I don’t think they fear injury when they play option teams.”

There is a difference between a Cut Block and a Chop Block. When will the media and major college football coaches figure this out?

Read The Full Article Here: Link

Photo:  Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chad Runge

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